Category Archives: Birds by State and Region

Chickadees of Maryland (2 Species to Know)

Chickadees are small, likable birds known for their friendliness and curiousness. In Maryland, there are two species that can be found in the state on an annual basis. Here is everything you need to know about those two species.

Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee
Identification

Black-capped Chickadees have a gray back and wings, tan wash on their sides, and black cap and throat. They have a light colored underside and white cheeks. In addition to visual identification clues, these birds make a variety of songs and notable calls including their springtime “cheeseburger” call and namesake “chickadee” call.

Range

Black-capped Chickadees are year-round residents of the Northern continental United States, southern Canada, and even parts of Alaska.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Black-capped Chickadees are fairly active feeders and eat different foods depending on the time of the year. During the warmer months when insects are more abundant, small invertebrates make up a larger part of their diet. In the winter, seeds, berries, and other plant matter make up a significantly larger portion of their diet.

Where to Find this Bird

Black-capped Chickadees are extremely common in areas with moderate to thick vegetation. This includes both deciduous and coniferous woods, parks, edge habitat, and backyards. They regularly visit bird feeders and are typically among the first species to find new feeders.

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Chickadee – Photo by Shenandoah National Park
Identification

Carolina Chickadees have a gray back and wings, buffy sides, and a light colored underside. They have a black cap, black chin, and white cheeks. They look incredibly identical to Black-capped Chickadees and in places where their ranges overlap are best identified by song.

Range

Carolina Chickadees are year-round residents of the southeastern United States. Their range also extends into some of the northeastern and midwestern states as far up as Ohio and Delaware.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Carolina Chickadees inhabit a wide variety of different places including edge habitat, parks, backyards, and deciduous forests. They can often be heard before they are seen, making a cheerful chickadee call (which is more rapid than the Black-capped Chickadee) along with other sounds.

Where to Find this Bird

True to their name, Boreal Chickadees can be found in Boreal forests, typically consisting of mostly coniferous trees. Often times, the best way to find them is to listen for their calls and try to triangulate their position from there.

Summary

Chickadees are always fun birds to see due to their cuteness and big personalities. We hope that this post has helped answer some questions about the chickadees of Maryland.

If you enjoyed this post, please check out the Badgerland Birding YouTube channel.

Nightjars of Ohio (3 Species to Know)

Nightjars are very interesting birds that are characterized by their superb camouflage and nocturnal lifestyle. Many of these species are familiar due to the sounds they make at night rather than what they look like and play an important role in the symphony of nighttime sounds that people hear.

In Ohio, there are three nightjar species that can be found in the state. Knowing what these species look like, sound like, and some of their habits can be instrumental in knowing which one you have encountered.

Chuck-will’s-widow (Rare)

Chuck-will’s-widow – Photo by Susan Young
Identification

Chuck-will’s-widows are camouflaged to look just like a tree branch with a base gray to brown color with darker and lighter patches of color mixed in. They have a short, flat, appearance with large eyes and a small bill. Males have light bands of color on their tail that are visible in flight.

Range

Chuck-will’s-widows are classic southern bird species that spend their summers in the Southeastern United States and can be found year-round in Southern Florida. Chuck-will’s-widows migrate south for the winter, residing in Eastern Mexico, Central America, Cuba, and Northeastern South America.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Chuck-will’s-widows are nocturnal hunters that feed primarily on insects, but have also been known to eat small birds and bats.

Where to Find This Bird

Chuck-will’s-widows can be found in scrubby or forested areas across their normal range. They are best found by listening for their call which sounds like they are saying their own name: “Chuck-will’s-widow.”

Common Nighthawk

Common Nighthawk – Photo by USFWS Mountain-Prairie
Identification

Common Nighthawks are compact looking birds with brown, gray, and tan mottled patterning on their back, head, and wings. They have brown stripes on their lighter colored underside, large eyes, and a small bill. Some characteristic markings of Common Nighthawks are white on the wings and under the chin.

Range

Common Nighthawks winter in South America and migrate north in spring. They are widespread across the United States and Canada but do not usually go as far north as Alaska. This species also summers in Western Mexico and lives year-round in Cuba and the surrounding islands.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Common Nighthawks feed on flying insects which they catch out of the air. They often feed near streetlights and other sources of light during the night that are attractors for insects. This species also feeds during the later parts of the daytime as well as the night.

Where to Find This Bird

Common Nighthawks can be found most easily by watching for them during migration when they can sometimes be seen in large numbers flying over during the late afternoon and early evening. Other ways to see these birds are to look out for them near large lights such as streetlights and stadiums where they will be looking to feed on insects that are attracted to the lights. Even if it’s dark out, listen for the sharp “beer” call of these birds to know that they are around.

Eastern Whip-poor-will

Eastern Whip-poor-will – Photo by Susan Young
Identification

Eastern Whip-poor-wills are a base brown color with lighter tan, gray, and darker brown mottling, making this species look like a log or tree branch. They have darker barring on a light underside, large eyes, and a small somewhat downturned bill.

Range

Eastern Whip-poor-wills winter in Central America, Eastern Mexico, and the Gulf Coast of the United States. In spring, they move north to their breeding areas in most of the Eastern United States and Southeastern Canada. There are some parts of the Eastern United States that Eastern Whip-poor-wills migrate through but do not spend the summer in.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Eastern Whip-poor-wills feed on insects. They will leave their perches to catch moths, beetles, and other flying insects out of the air and then return to the same perch. Since this species has a surprisingly large mouth, they can eat insects that are fairly sizable.

Where to Find This Bird

Eastern Whip-poor-wills can be found in forests close to more open areas such as fields. The best way to find them is to go out at night and listen for their namesake “whip-poor-will” call.

Summary

Nightjars are enigmatic and mysterious birds that aren’t often seen due to their nocturnal nature. Knowing the species that are expected in your state can be instrumental in identifying which one you are looking at or hearing. Hopefully, this article has helped in answering some questions about the nightjars of Ohio.

If you enjoyed this post, please give it a like and a comment. Also be sure to check out the Badgerland Birding YouTube Channel.

Woodpeckers of South Dakota (11 Species to Know)

Woodpeckers are unique birds that specialize in using their bills to bore holes in wood for the purpose of finding insects and other invertebrates to eat. There are many different species of woodpeckers that live in North America and eleven species that can be found in the state of South Dakota. Here is everything you need to know about these eleven species.

American Three-toed Woodpecker

American Three-toed Woodpecker – Photo by David Mitchell CC 2.0
Identification

American Three-toed Woodpeckers have black wing and a black tail. Their underside and back are white with blurred black barring. They have black stripes on the head and face and males also sport a yellow forehead which females lack.

Range

American Three-toed Woodpeckers are year-round residents of most of Canada and Alaska. In the continental United States they can be found in some of the states bordering Canada as well as some of the states in teh west including Washington, Montana, Idaho, and Colorado among others.

Diet and Foraging Habits

American Three-toed Woodpeckers diet consists mostly of beetle larva which they find under the bark of or inside of trees. They will also eat other types of insects and other invertebrates such as spiders. This species has also been known to drill sap wells in trees and lap up the sap, much like sapsuckers do.

Where to Find This Bird

American Three-toed Woodpeckers can be found in coniferous forests. They typically prefer areas that have numerous dead trees such as burned areas or forests damaged in some other way. Both boreal and mountain forests are home to these birds with boreal forest representing more of their range in Canada and mountain forest being a more common place for them in the west.

Black-backed Woodpecker

Black-backed Woodpecker – Photo by Matthew Thompson
Identification

True to their name, Black-backed Woodpeckers have a black back, wings, head, and tail. They have a light underside with black barring on their stomach and sides. Male Black-backed Woodpeckers have yellow on the front of their head which the females lack.

Range

Black-backed Woodpeckers are year-round residents of the boreal forests of Canada, Alaska, and parts of the Northern United States. In the continental US, the Northern forests of the Northeast, Midwest, and far west are all places that Black-backed Woodpeckers can be found in.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Black-backed Woodpeckers feed on wood-boring insects and the larva of wood-boring insects. They use their bills to peck holes into wood and then use their specialized tongues to pull out their prey.

Where to Find This Bird

Black-backed Woodpeckers are most easily found in Boreal forests. They are especially fond of areas that recently burned and can stay in recently burned forests for around a decade before moving on.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker
Identification

Downy Woodpeckers are among the most recognizable woodpecker species in the United States due to their propensity for visiting bird feeders and widespread range. They are on the small side for a woodpecker, have a white underside, a white back, and black wings with checkered white mixed in. Downy Woodpeckers have a white head with black stripe on the top of the head, through the eye, and along what can best be described as the jawline. Males have a noticeable red spot on the back of their head that females lack. It’s also worth noting that the bill of the Downy Woodpecker is relatively small compared to the similar looking Hairy Woodpecker.

Range

Downy Woodpeckers do not migrate and live year round throughout most of the continental United States and Southern Canada. Their range even stretches as far as Southern Alaska but it does not extend into the Southeastern US or Mexico.

Diet and Foraging Habits

downy Woodpeckers feed primarily on insects and other invertebrates that they find inside of trees and underneath bark. They also occasionally eat berries and seeds,

Where to Find This Bird

Downy Woodpeckers can typically be found in deciduous forests as well as in more urban areas such as backyards and parks. This species comes to bird feeding stations regularly where they will eat suet as well as black oil sunflower seeds.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker
Identification

Hairy Woodpeckers are medium sized birds with a white underside, black wings, and a black tail. Male Hairy Woodpeckers have a red marking on the back of their black and white striped head. while females lack this red coloration. Hairy Woodpeckers have a longer bill than the comparable Downy Woodpecker which is helpful to note when distinguishing between the two.

Range

Hairy Woodpeckers are nonmigratory and live throughout much of North America including most of Canada and even parts of Mexico. There are some isolated areas where the normal range of the Hairy Woodpecker does not extend to such as parts of Oregon, Washington, and Southern Texas.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Hairy Woodpeckers are primarily insect eaters. They are especially fond of wood-boring insects and will congregate in areas where trees have recently been burned as more wood-boring insects are often present in these areas.

Where to Find This Bird

Hairy Woodpeckers can be found pretty much anywhere there are large trees. Deciduous and coniferous woods, backyards, edge habitats, and even swamps are all areas that can play host to this species. Hairy Woodpeckers will also visit backyards where they will feed on suet.

Lewis’s Woodpecker (Rare)

Lewis’s Woodpecker
Identification

Lewis’s Woodpeckers have a black back, wings, and tail with a noticeable green sheen. They have black on the top of their head that looks something like a hood. They have a red face, a reddish pink washed underside, and a light colored chest and collar.

Range

Lewis’s Woodpeckers are birds of the western United States and southwestern Canada. They live year-round in California, Oregon, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico, and parts of Utah among a few others. In winter, this species moves slightly farther south and in summer they move farther north.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Unlike many other woodpeckers, Lewis’s Woodpeckers don’t find most of their food by pecking into trees but rather opting to catch insects out of the air. They also eat fruits, seeds, and nuts which they will stash in tree crevices to save for later.

Where to Find This Bird

Lewis’s Woodpeckers can be found in open woodland habitats with copious amounts of dead trees. They are found of both pinyon nad ponderosa pine habitats as well as forest edges.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker (Red-shafted) – Photo by Alan Schmierer
Identification

Northern Flickers come in two different varieties, the Yellow-shafted and the Red-shafted. Both subspecies have a lighter underside, darker wings, and large black spots. Male Yellow-shafted Flickers have a black “whisker” marking by the bill, gray on the top of their head and a red patch on the head as well. Male Red-shafted Flickers have a red whisker marking. Females of both of these subspecies lack any whisker marking.

One of the biggest differences between these two subspecies is the tail and wing feathers. Yellow-shafted Flickers show yellow on these feathers while Red-shafted Flickers show an orangey red color. These color differences are incredibly noticeable in flight.

Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) – Photo by Susan Young
Range

Northern Flickers are year-round residents of much of the continental United States, parts of Mexico, and some countries in Central America. Many of these birds migrate north in spring and spread into Canada to breed. Their numbers are at their highest in the continental United States in spring.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Northern Flickers eat many different species of insects as well as fruits, seeds, and nuts. These birds forage differently than other woodpeckers species as they spend a lot of time on the ground in addition to searching for insects up in trees. Another interesting thing about Northern Flickers is that they are particularly known for eating ants.

Where to Find This Bird

Northern Flickers can be found in pretty much any area with trees. Forest edges, deciduous woods, parks, and backyards are all places Northern Flickers frequent. Keep an eye out for flashes of yellow or red (depending on the subspecies) visible in flight.

Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker
Identification

Pileated Woodpeckers are absolutely massive birds that are somewhat shocking to see as they fly through. They have a black back and underside with a bright red head crest. Both males and females have black stripes from their neck and through their eye. Males have red behind their bill whereas females just have black.

Range

Pileated Woodpeckers live year round in most of the Eastern United States. They also inhabit Southern Canada and some parts of the western Coast of the United States. In the West, California, Oregon, and Washington among other states that play host to these impressive birds.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Pileated Woodpeckers eat a variety of different insects, but they specialize in eating ants. In particular, carpenter ants make up quite a large portion of this birds diet.

Where to Find This Bird

Pileated Woodpeckers can be found in old growth forests with plenty of large trees. They live in deciduous and mixed coniferous woods. Listen for the laughing call of these birds that can be heard from miles away.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Identification

Red-bellied Woodpeckers have a tannish gray face and underside, black and white striped back, and red on the head. Males have more red on the head than females do. The name Red-bellied Woodpecker comes from a small bit of red that can sometimes be seen on the underside of the bird but is not always visible.

Range

Red-bellied Woodpeckers can be found throughout most of the Eastern United States year-round. Their range expands slightly west of the Mississippi River but dos not typically extend north into Canada or south into Mexico.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Red-bellied Woodpeckers eat a wide variety of food items including insects, fruits, seeds, and small animals. They have been known to visit bird feeders where they will take seeds, nuts, and pieces of suet.

Where to Find This Bird

Red-bellied Woodpeckers can be found pretty much anywhere with large trees including deciduous forests, swamps, backyards, and parks.

Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpecker – Photo by Bill Grossmeyer
Identification

The extremely aptly named Red-headed Woodpecker can be identified by its white underside, black back, white “backpack” markings on the wings, and of course, its bright red head. Juveniles look similar but with a dark colored head.

Range

Red-headed Woodpeckers are birds of the Eastern United States. They can be found year-round from Florida and Mississippi all the way up through Southern Michigan and New York. In winter, this species moves slightly farther southwest in Texas and in summer they move northwest to the Dakotas and even into south-central Canada and further north in the Midwest and northeast.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Red-headed Woodpeckers eat a wide variety of different food items including insects, fruit, and seeds. They are among the most actively foraging woodpecker species and are known to catch insects out of the air.

Where to Find This Bird

Red-headed Woodpeckers reside in deciduous woods as well as more open areas with more sparse tree cover such as areas that have recently been burned. Forest edges are also another great place to find this species.

Red-naped Sapsucker

Red-naped Sapsucker – Photo by Alan Schmierer
Identification

Red-naped Sapsuckers have a light colored underside with a yellowish wash and a black back and wings. On their wings they also have white on the wing and a white v-shape marking on their back. Additionally, this species is known for the bright red color on the top of their head, on their throat, and on the nape of their neck. The amount of red on the nape of the neck can be variable and males have more read on their chin than females do.

Range

Red-aped Sapsuckers have a year-round range in parts of Arizona, New Mexico, California, Nevada, and Utah. In winter, they move into Mexico, and during summer they can be found as far north as western Canada.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Red-aped Sapsuckers eat fruits, insects, and tree sap. To access the sap, they drill holes in teh tree and use their tongue to lap up the sap as opposed to “sucking” it like their name would indicate.

Where to Find This Bird

Red-naped Sapsuckers can be found in a variety of different forests including evergreen and deciduous forests. They can readily be found in high elevation up to 1,000 feet and as low as 1,000 feet.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker – Photo by Bill Grossmeyer
Identification

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers are quite dapper birds with black wings, and black stripes on their white faces. They also have a large white marking on each of their wings, black and white blurring on the back, and some barring on their flanks. This species also has some splashes of color as well, including a namesake pale yellow on their chest, and a red crown. Males also have a red throat which differentiates them from the females.

Range

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers are migratory and spend the winter from the Southeastern United States all the way through Mexico and Central America. In Spring, these woodpeckers move north and occupy the Northeastern United States and Southern Canada. It’s worth noting that while not indicated by range maps, some individuals have been known to spend the winter fairly far north in the Eastern US.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers eat insects, fruit, and as their name suggests, sap. They eat tree sap by drilling holes in the trees and then eating the sap that fills them, They will usually make these holes in rows that look something like a grid. Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers are particularly fond of trees with high sugar contents in the sap such as certain types of birches and maples.

Where to Find This Bird

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers can be found in forested areas and edge habitats. They spend a lot of time attending to and drilling their sap wells, so areas that have been tapped before by these birds will most likely be revisited again.

Summary

Woodpeckers are indeed interesting birds with unique habits but a general look that spans across the different birds that make up the group. Knowing the specific details of how to identify them and what habitats to find them in can be of great help while out in the field.

If you enjoyed this post, please give it a like and a comment. Also be sure to check out the Badgerland Birding Youtube Channel.

Common Backyard Birds of the Midwest (United States)

Backyard bird watching is a huge hobby all across North America. People love being able to look out their windows and see all of the different species coming to partake in the feast. One of the most exciting things about backyard bird watching is being able to identify the plethora of different birds that reside in backyards and distinguish them from one another. If you’d like to learn about some of the common species you might be seeing in your yard, then this is the post for you. Here are 15 common backyard birds of the Midwestern United States.

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

American Goldfinches can light up a yard with their bright coloration and cheerful songs. During their breeding season, goldfinches can be identified by the yellow that covers their body as well as the black on their head and wings. During non-breeding season their colors are more subdued. American Goldfinches can be found in every state in the continental United States at one point of the year or another. They follow a south to north migratory pattern wintering in the southern states and northern Mexico and and breeding farther north in the United States and southern Canada. If you want to attract goldfinches to your yard, putting up seed feeders, especially thistle and sunflower seeds can be a great way to draw them in. Once American Goldfinches find a reliable food source they will often stick around, content to feed with other backyard birds, especially other finches.

Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove

Mourning Doves are plump, gray and peach colored birds widespread across North America. They are slightly darker on the back and wings and lighter on the underside. They also have noticeably pink feet. Mourning Doves are year-round residents in most parts of the continental United States and move north into southern Canada in the summer. Look for this species perched on power lines, rooftops, and tree branches in or near your yard. Another place to look for Mourning Doves is along the ground where they are well camouflaged against the earth and leaf litter. You don’t have to do much to attract these birds as they are quite numerous and will feed at platform feeders and under other types of feeders.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpeckers are petite looking woodpeckers identified by their small bill, white underside, black and white wings and back and red spot on the head of the males. They look very similar to the slightly larger Hairy Woodpecker, you can check out the link in the description below for more info on how to differentiate these two species. Downy Woodpeckers are year round residents throughout most of the U.S. with the exception of some of the southeastern states. They can be seen climbing up and down tree trunks and branches looking for food in bark and excavating insects and larvae that live under the wood. If you want to attract Downy Woodpeckers to your yard, putting up suet is a great way to do so. Suet will also bring in other types of woodpeckers, nuthatches, and more.

House Sparrow

House Sparrow
House Sparrow

House Sparrows are probably one of the most familiar bird species in the United States due to the fact that they are extremely common in cities and around human habitation. Males have a gray underside, a brown mottled back, a gray cap, and a chestnut marking by the eye. Females have the same gray underside and a similar mottled back, but far less extravagant facial features. There is a lot of debate about House Sparrows as they are actually a non-native species in the United States and have been known to cause problems for some of the native bird species, especially cavity nesters like bluebirds. Realistically, House Sparrows have been in the country so long that they won’t be going anywhere anytime soon and tend to hang out in groups near bird feeders and buildings. They will eat a wide variety of seeds and are also fond of cracked corn. Check out some of our other videos about House Sparrows including how to dissuade them from visiting your bird feeders.

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbirds are aptly named as the males are a shiny black color with a distinctive red and orange colored patch on each of their wings. Females look drastically different as they are a mixture of brown and tan and have a noticeable eyebrow stripe as well as striping on the underside. For many people in North America, Red-winged Blackbirds are a species that marks the beginning of spring as they are among the earlier arriving migratory birds to move north. While they can sometimes show up in low numbers, more often than not, they travel and feed in large groups. These flocks are not always just composed of Red-winged Blackbirds but also many other blackbird species including grackles and cowbirds among others. Chances are you’ll hear these loud birds before you see them, as they have one of the most recognizable calls in the country.

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

One of the brightest backyard birds in the eastern United States, Blue Jays not only have a beautiful color and pattern, but also have loads of personality. Like most jays, these intelligent birds are very social and inquisitive. They make a variety of sounds including their typical squawking noise, various alarm calls, and even an imitation Red-tailed Hawk call good enough to fool Merlins sound ID feature. Given their large size and somewhat aggressive nature, Blue Jays can cause a commotion when they visit feeders although they typically don’t stay very long but prefer to grab a food item and fly off with it. Some things they are particularly fond of are walnuts and peanuts, but these omnivores eat many different things.

American Robin

American Robin

Known by many as a harbinger of spring, robins are among the earlier arriving migratory birds in the north each year. However, not all of them migrate and some stay in the northern parts of the country as long as they can find enough food. Easily identified by their grayish colored back and orangey chest and underside, these members of the thrush family can be seen more often hopping around the yard than at a traditional bird feeder. American Robins diets change depending on the time of year and the food that’s available. During the warmer months, robins feed on insects and other invertebrates, most notably worms which they pull straight from the ground. During the colder months of the year and in areas where the ground is frozen and no insects are around, American Robins feed mostly on fruits including berries and crabapples.

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatches are extremely entertaining to watch around bird feeding stations. These acrobatic birds hop up and down trees, hang upside down, and make their distinctive laughing call. White-breasted Nuthatches have a grayish-blue back and wings, black head, and white underside making them fairly easy to differentiate from other birds that climb up and down trees such as woodpeckers and Brown Creepers.  These spunky birds eat many different types of food including seeds, which they will typically nab from feeders and take to a perch to eat or store for later. They will also eat from suet feeders as well. White-breasted Nuthatches can be found in places with deciduous trees and are less frequent in coniferous areas. They live all across the continental United States and are generally nonmigratory although they do have regional movements in some parts of the country.

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Known by many as the epitome of a “snowbird” due to the fact that they move south into the continental United States in the winter, dark eyed Juncos are among the most numerous birds in North America. They come in many different subspecies but all have a somewhat similar appearance with either gray or brown on their back and wings and a light colored underside. Some subspecies such as the Oregon subspecies have a dark colored hood. Members of the sparrow family, Dark-eyed Juncos are very common around bird feeders and have a pension for feeding along the ground oftentimes with other species such as American Tree Sparrows. These winter birds can be identified quickly by looking for the white edges on their tail which are extremely visible in flight.

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal

One of the most well-known and beloved birds in Eastern North America, the Northern Cardinal is easily identified by the male’s bright red color and black mask. Females are much more dull, sporting a grayish tan color but still showing red on their crest, wings, and tail. Away from backyards and bird feeders, cardinals prefer habitats with dense cover and tangled branches, however, males can sometimes be seen out in the open singing. Around bird feeders, cardinals can be fairly skittish and are among the species that will feed latest in the evening, often showing up after the sun has already set. If you live in areas near deciduous forests or even shrubs and other cover, Northern Cardinals will most likely find your bird feeder.

House Finch

House Finch

House Finches were originally native to the western half of the United States and Mexico. They were released in New York after trying to sell them in the pet trade. Affectionately known as the Hollywood Finch, they now inhabit the majority of the United States adding color to the backyard birding scene with the males bright red on their head and chest as well as darker streaking on the sides. Females are more drab, lacking the red, but still sporting the same dark streaking. House Finches can often be seen at seed feeders eating alongside other backyard bird species. They will also eat fruits, especially during the colder months where they frequent berry bushes and other sorts of fruiting trees. 

Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadee

One of the friendliest and most curious birds in the region, Black-capped Chickadees are a very common site in backyards and around bird feeders. Identified by their gray back and wings, tan wash on their sides, and black cap and throat, these birds make a variety of songs and calls including their springtime “cheeseburger” call and namesake chickadee call. Black-capped Chickadees are abundant in forests, parks, and other areas with at least some trees and vegetation. These cheerful birds eat many different food items including insects, berries, suet, and seeds. Around bird feeders, Black-capped Chickadees will usually take a seed and fly to a nearby perch to consume it. As mentioned, these birds can be incredibly friendly toward humans and can even be trained to take seeds directly from their hands.

Common Grackle

Common Grackle

In the midwest, Common Grackles typically arrive in early spring where they can quickly monopolize bird feeders along with other blackbird species. These medium sized birds are dark bodied but have an iridescent sheen along with a blue head. For much of the year, Common Grackles consume mostly seeds, but when available they will also eat different animals ranging from small invertebrates to larger creatures like amphibians and even small mammals. Keep an eye out for these birds during migration as they can sometimes show up in some impressively large flocks making their loud and noisy calls.

European Starling

European Starling

European Starlings are a common site in cities as well as agricultural areas. These birds were not originally native to the United States but were brought over around the same time that other European species such as the House Sparrow first made their appearance in the new world. Starlings are very appealing looking with their plumage ranging from silky black with iridescent purple and green to speckled with white depending on where they are in their molt cycle. Starlings can dominate backyard feeders as they show up in large groups and eat a variety of different seeds. Speaking of large groups, starlings are known for their undulating flocks called murmurations which are quite the spectacle to see.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

One of the smallest backyard birds, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird is by far the most common hummingbird in the eastern United States. Males have a shiny green back, wings, and head along with a brilliant red throat. Females lack this red throat but have the same green color as the male. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are common sites around backyards in the midwest in spring and summer where they quickly buzz in to feed on flowers. If you have a flower garden, you can plant specific flowers that these birds love or put out a hummingbird feeder.

Summary

Feeding backyard birds can certainly be a fun and enjoyable experience. Getting to know the species visiting your yard can make it even better! We hope you found this video helpful and if you’d like to learn more about a particular bird species or the birds of a different region, let us know in the comments below. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you next time, on Badgerland Birding.

Bluebirds of Connecticut (1 Species to Know)

Bluebirds are affable members of the thrush family named for their coloration. There are three species of bluebirds native to North America, and only one species that can be found in Connecticut. Here is everything you need to know about that species.

Eastern Bluebird

Male Eastern Bluebird
Identification

Male Eastern Bluebirds have a sky blue back, wings, tail, and head. They have a reddish orange chest and underside as well as a very faint eye ring. Females have a grayish colored head with blue wings and a darker orange underside with a more noticeable eye ring. Both males and females have white on their underside near their legs.

Range

Eastern Bluebirds live year-round in parts of Mexico, Central America, and the Southeastern United States. In summer, many of them move north into the Northeastern United States and Southeastern Canada.

Diet and Foraging Habits

The diet of Eastern Bluebird varies depending on the time of the year. When insects are available, they make up an extremely large part of their diet. Other times of the year this species eats an array of fruits.

Where to Find This Bird

Eastern Bluebirds can be found around open spaces near edge habitat. Prairies, fields, and pastures are all places where this species can be found regularly in addition to more forested areas as well as around ponds.

Badgerland Birding searches for Eastern Bluebirds

Summary

Bluebirds are typically birds that people are happy to see. Knowing more about the species that are expected in your area can be instrumental in finding and identifying them. Hopefully, this article has helped to answer some questions about the bluebirds of Connecticut.

If you enjoyed this post, please give it a like and a comment. Also be sure to check out the Badgerland Birding YouTube Channel

Loons of Missouri (3 Species to Know)

Loons are beautiful and majestic birds that spend almost their entire lives on the water. There are five species of loons in North America and three of them that can be found in Missouri with one being very common and the other two being quite rare. Knowing where to find them and what to look for in terms of identification can be incredibly helpful in knowing which of the three species you are looking at in the field.

Common Loon

Common Loon – Photo by Alan SChmierer
Identification

In breeding plumage, Common Loons have a black back, wings, neck, and head with white checkerboard markings on the wings, and a white “necklace” marking. The black on the head and neck is iridescent and can show a green sheen in the right lighting. Common Loons have a white underside and some thin black striping on the neck going down the sides. In nonbreeding plumage, this species is dark gray brown on the back, wings, and top of the head. They also have white on the throat and underside. The species still displays the white necklace marking even in nonbreeding plumage.

Range

Common Loons are extremely wide spread throughout North America. In winter, they can be found wintering along the ocean coastlines of both the Atlantic and the Pacific. They winter as far south as Mexico and as far north as the Aleutian Islands. In spring, the birds wintering in the Southern parts of the continent move north into the Northern United States and most of Canada where they spend the summer.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Common Loons feed primarily on fish but will also eat crustaceans and aquatic invertebrates. They are extremely good at diving for food and can stay underwater for considerable amounts of time. While some species are ambush predators such as herons, Loons are active hunters as they are very agile swimmers.

Where to Find This Bird

As their name would suggest, Common Loons are in fact common in most parts of the United States and Canada at least for some portion of the year. During winter, this species can be seen on the ocean coastlines, while in spring they tend to appear on inland lakes and ponds. During their breeding season, look for Common Loons in deep, clear lakes in the boreal forests where they prefer plenty of plant cover along the shores.

Pacific Loon (Rare)

Pacific Loon – Photo by Alaska Region U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Identification

Pacific Loons are chunky birds with rather complex patterning when in breeding plumage. They have brownish black backs and wings with large white square-shaped markings along with white spots. They have a grayish head with a purplish front of the neck and white and black vertical stripes on the side of the neck. The underside of this species is white. In nonbreeding plumage, Pacific Loons are brownish gray with a white underside.

Range

The aptly named Pacific Loon winters all along the Pacific coast of the United States from Mexico to Alaska. In spring, they move to their breeding grounds in Northern Canada, Alaska, and Eastern Asia.

Diet and Foraging Habits

The vast majority of the Pacific Loon’s diet is comprised of fish. They will also eat crustaceans and aquatic invertebrates.

Where to Find This Bird

Look for Pacific Loons on the coastlines of the Pacific Ocean where they prefer areas with sandy bottoms as opposed to rocky bottoms. During breeding season, this species can be found in tundra ponds and lakes.

Red-throated Loon (Uncommon)

Red-throated Loon – Photo by Alaska Region U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Identification

In breeding plumage, Red-throated Loons have a grayish brown back and wings. Most of their head and neck is gray with white striping on the back of the neck going up to the top of the head. They have a deep red colored throat which is where they get their name from. In nonbreeding plumage, Red-throated Loons have a white throat and underside. They also have a dark brownish gray back and head with white speckles.

Range

Red-throated Loons winter on the coasts of the United States and Canada. They don’t typically make it too far into Mexico or the Gulf Coast but will winter as far north as Southern Alaska. In spring, they move north across the continent making appearances in large bodies of water such as the Great Lakes. They breed in Northern and Western Canada, Greenland, Alaska, and Eastern Asia.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Red-throated Loons eat a wide variety of fish and invertebrates including squid, crustaceans, aquatic insects, and marine worms. Like other loon species, these birds dive for their food and actively hunt small creatures below the surface.

Where to Find This Bird

Red-throated Loons can be found in open waters along the coasts of oceans as well as larger bodies of water such as the Great Lakes. During migration, they can also be found on inland lakes.

Summary

Loons are fascinating divers that provide nice variety among other water-dwelling birds. Knowing the species that are expected in your state and region can be instrumental in identifying which one you’re looking at in the field. Hopefully, this article has helped to answer some questions about the loons of Missouri.

If you enjoyed this post, please give it a like and a comment. Also be sure to check out the Badgerland Birding YouTube Channel.

Cranes of Colorado (1 Species to Know)

Cranes are among the largest and most noticeable birds in North America. These birds are always impressive to see when out birding and can turn up in some places you wouldn’t expect to see these tall, regal birds. In North America there are two crane species, and one of them can be found in Colorado. Here is everything you need to know about that species.

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane – Photo by Bill Grossmeyer
Identification

Sandhill Cranes have a mostly gray colored body with tan color mixed in. During the warmer months they typically are more tan than they are gray. They have a long neck and bill with white cheeks and red on top of their head.

Sandhill Crane chicks are a yellowish tan color and can often be seen tagging along with the adult parents.

Range

Sandhill Cranes winter in a few different areas around North America including northern Mexico, southern Texas, Florida, parts of California, parts of southern Louisiana, and other areas across the Great Plains states. In spring, they start heading north to breed in the northern United States and southern Canada. There are a few places where Sandhill Cranes stage prior to migration where they can be seen in absolutely massive numbers. Most of these areas are in the upper Midwest in states such as Minnesota and North Dakota.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Sandhill Cranes eat a wide variety of different food items. Much of their diet consists of plant matter such as tubers, berries, and seeds, but they also eat small vertebrates, insects and other invertebrates. Sandhill Cranes forage in shallow water as well as in farm fields where they eat grains from crops.

Where to Find This Bird

Sandhill Cranes can be seen in many different places. Some of the most common areas to find this species are shallow water marshes and open fields. However, Sandhill Cranes also show up on lawns in neighborhoods and even in parking lots in cities where they casually stroll around, often to the surprise of humans.

Summary

Cranes are spectacular birds to see as an avid birder or just a casual observer. Knowing where to expect them and which species are likely to be in your state and region can make it much easier to find and identify them.

If you enjoyed this post, please give it a like and a comment. Also be sure to check out the Badgerland Birding YouTube Channel.

Nightjars of Missouri (3 Species to Know)

Nightjars are very interesting birds that are characterized by their superb camouflage and nocturnal lifestyle. Many of these species are familiar due to the sounds they make at night rather than what they look like and play an important role in the symphony of nighttime sounds that people hear.

In Missouri, there are three nightjar species that can be found in the state. Knowing what these species look like, sound like, and some of their habits can be instrumental in knowing which one you have encountered.

Chuck-will’s-widow

Chuck-will’s-widow – Photo by Susan Young
Identification

Chuck-will’s-widows are camouflaged to look just like a tree branch with a base gray to brown color with darker and lighter patches of color mixed in. They have a short, flat, appearance with large eyes and a small bill. Males have light bands of color on their tail that are visible in flight.

Range

Chuck-will’s-widows are classic southern bird species that spend their summers in the Southeastern United States and can be found year-round in Southern Florida. Chuck-will’s-widows migrate south for the winter, residing in Eastern Mexico, Central America, Cuba, and Northeastern South America.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Chuck-will’s-widows are nocturnal hunters that feed primarily on insects, but have also been known to eat small birds and bats.

Where to Find This Bird

Chuck-will’s-widows can be found in scrubby or forested areas across their normal range. They are best found by listening for their call which sounds like they are saying their own name: “Chuck-will’s-widow.”

Common Nighthawk

Common Nighthawk – Photo by USFWS Mountain-Prairie
Identification

Common Nighthawks are compact looking birds with brown, gray, and tan mottled patterning on their back, head, and wings. They have brown stripes on their lighter colored underside, large eyes, and a small bill. Some characteristic markings of Common Nighthawks are white on the wings and under the chin.

Range

Common Nighthawks winter in South America and migrate north in spring. They are widespread across the United States and Canada but do not usually go as far north as Alaska. This species also summers in Western Mexico and lives year-round in Cuba and the surrounding islands.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Common Nighthawks feed on flying insects which they catch out of the air. They often feed near streetlights and other sources of light during the night that are attractors for insects. This species also feeds during the later parts of the daytime as well as the night.

Where to Find This Bird

Common Nighthawks can be found most easily by watching for them during migration when they can sometimes be seen in large numbers flying over during the late afternoon and early evening. Other ways to see these birds are to look out for them near large lights such as streetlights and stadiums where they will be looking to feed on insects that are attracted to the lights. Even if it’s dark out, listen for the sharp “beer” call of these birds to know that they are around.

Eastern Whip-poor-will

Eastern Whip-poor-will – Photo by Susan Young
Identification

Eastern Whip-poor-wills are a base brown color with lighter tan, gray, and darker brown mottling, making this species look like a log or tree branch. They have darker barring on a light underside, large eyes, and a small somewhat downturned bill.

Range

Eastern Whip-poor-wills winter in Central America, Eastern Mexico, and the Gulf Coast of the United States. In spring, they move north to their breeding areas in most of the Eastern United States and Southeastern Canada. There are some parts of the Eastern United States that Eastern Whip-poor-wills migrate through but do not spend the summer in.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Eastern Whip-poor-wills feed on insects. They will leave their perches to catch moths, beetles, and other flying insects out of the air and then return to the same perch. Since this species has a surprisingly large mouth, they can eat insects that are fairly sizable.

Where to Find This Bird

Eastern Whip-poor-wills can be found in forests close to more open areas such as fields. The best way to find them is to go out at night and listen for their namesake “whip-poor-will” call.

Summary

Nightjars are enigmatic and mysterious birds that aren’t often seen due to their nocturnal nature. Knowing the species that are expected in your state can be instrumental in identifying which one you are looking at or hearing. Hopefully, this article has helped in answering some questions about the nightjars of Missouri.

If you enjoyed this post, please give it a like and a comment. Also be sure to check out the Badgerland Birding YouTube Channel.

Cranes of Ohio (2 Species to Know)

Cranes are among the largest and most noticeable birds in North America. These birds are always impressive to see when out birding and can turn up in some places you wouldn’t expect to see these tall, regal birds. In North America there are two crane species, and both of them can be found in Ohio. Here is everything you need to know about those two species.

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane – Photo by Bill Grossmeyer
Identification

Sandhill Cranes have a mostly gray colored body with tan color mixed in. During the warmer months they typically are more tan than they are gray. They have a long neck and bill with white cheeks and red on top of their head.

Sandhill Crane chicks are a yellowish tan color and can often be seen tagging along with the adult parents.

Range

Sandhill Cranes winter in a few different areas around North America including northern Mexico, southern Texas, Florida, parts of California, parts of southern Louisiana, and other areas across the Great Plains states. In spring, they start heading north to breed in the northern United States and southern Canada. There are a few places where Sandhill Cranes stage prior to migration where they can be seen in absolutely massive numbers. Most of these areas are in the upper Midwest in states such as Minnesota and North Dakota.

Diet and Foraging Habits

Sandhill Cranes eat a wide variety of different food items. Much of their diet consists of plant matter such as tubers, berries, and seeds, but they also eat small vertebrates, insects and other invertebrates. Sandhill Cranes forage in shallow water as well as in farm fields where they eat grains from crops.

Where to Find This Bird

Sandhill Cranes can be seen in many different places. Some of the most common areas to find this species are shallow water marshes and open fields. However, Sandhill Cranes also show up on lawns in neighborhoods and even in parking lots in cities where they casually stroll around, often to the surprise of humans.

Whooping Crane (Rare)

Whooping Crane – Photo by Bill Grossmeyer
Identification

Whooping Cranes are absolutely massive, reaching heights of around five feet. They have a clean white body and red that covers their face and extends along the jaw line and on the top of the head. In flight, these cranes show black on the wing tips.

Range

The Whooping Cranes range is a bit complicated since they are actually split up into different populations. There are nonmigratory populations in Louisiana and Florida and migratory populations that winter in Florida and Texas and then migrate to Wisconsin and Canada respectively.

Diet and Foraging Habits

The large size of the Whooping Crane means they can eat many different types of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates. They not only eat animals however, but also various plant material, both aquatic and terrestrial.

Where to Find This Bird

Whooping Cranes are most commonly found in marshland where they wade into water in search of food. Along their migratory routes they are seen in fields and wet grasslands. During their wintering times, they also reside in coastal waters and saltmarshes.

Summary

Cranes are spectacular birds to see as an avid birder or just a casual observer. Knowing where to expect them and which species are likely to be in your state and region can make it much easier to find and identify them.

If you enjoyed this post, please give it a like and a comment. Also be sure to check out the Badgerland Birding YouTube Channel.

Geese of Connecticut (8 Species to Know)

Geese can be loud, but also beautiful birds that can be found throughout North America. Since there are only a handful of species that call the United States home, geese can be a good group to start with if you’re just beginning to learn bird identification. Both males and females of these species look the same as far as plumage, and they do not have different colorations in different seasons.

Connecticut is home to many different goose species with some being common and others being rare. Here is everything you need to know about those species.

Brant

Brant
Identification

The Brant is a medium-sized goose that is smaller than a Canada Goose, but larger than a Mallard duck. They have a black head, stubby black bill, black neck and upper chest, with a brown and white body, white rump, and black wingtips. They have a characteristic white mark on their neck that can be variable in size and shape.

Range

Brants normally migrate through parts of the western and northeastern United States and parts of Canada, with some wintering populations on the east coast and in Alaska. They nest in the arctic wetlands of northern North America.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

Brants feed mostly on vegetation such as grasses, sedges, and aquatic plants. In the winter, they eat mainly eelgrass and algae, although in some areas they will also eat other grasses if eelgrass is not available.

Where to Find this Bird

The Brant is rare in most midwestern states. Keep an eye out for this bird in flocks of other goose species, normally found near water or in open grassy areas or farm fields.

Canada Goose

Canada Goose
Identification

Adult Canada Geese are large birds with a black head and neck, white cheek, brown back and sides, black feet and legs, with a white stomach and rump. They are larger, have a longer neck, and a longer bill than the closely related Cackling Goose. It’s worth noting that there are many different subspecies of Canada Geese that can vary slightly in size and appearance.

Range

Common year-round throughout much of North America, the Canada Goose migrates south in the winter and north throughout the Northern U.S., Canada and Alaska in the summer. Once seen as a majestic migratory bird, many Canada Geese have spread to urban environments and can be seen hissing at those that get too close to them or their young.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

During spring, Canada Geese feed mostly on grasses, and during the fall and winter, they eat mostly seeds and berries.

Where to Find this Bird

Look for Canada Geese near water, in open or grassy fields often in large flocks. They can also be found in and near urban ponds. Look for them flying overhead making the classic goose “honk” and flying in a “V” formation.

Listen to the Canada Goose Call – Jonathan Jongsma (CC by 3.0)
A flock of birds illustrating the “V” formation flight pattern (Mussi Katz photo)

Cackling Goose

Cackling Goose (front) with Canada Goose (behind)
Identification

Adult Cackling Geese look very similar to Canada Geese, but with some key identification differences. They have similar color patterns with a black head and neck, white cheek, brown back and sides, black feet and legs, with a white stomach and rump, however they are smaller (about Mallard duck sized) with a stubbier neck, steep forehead, and smaller, more triangular shaped bill. They will often flock with Canada Geese, along with other geese species. These flocks can be extremely large during migration.

Click here to get more information on how to differentiate Cackling Geese from Canada Geese.

Range

The Cackling Goose spends winter in the central U.S. and Central America, with some populations near the East and West coasts. Their migratory route spans the central U.S. and west coast, and they migrate to northern North America to breed.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

Cackling Geese feed mostly on plants and plant material such as grasses, sedges, seeds, and berries.

Where to Find this Bird

Look for Cackling Geese near water, in open or grassy fields, and in mixed flocks. Also look for them flying overhead with other goose species, and keep an eye out for noticeable smaller birds, compared to Canada Geese.

Snow Goose

Snow Geese (2 blue morph left and 1 white morph, right) (Bill Grossmeyer photo)
Blue morph Snow Goose (Bill Grossmeyer photo)
Identification

Snow Geese are majestic birds that come in different color morphs. The adult white morph Snow Goose has an all white body, black wingtips, and a pinkish-orange bill with a black “grin patch”. A “grin patch” is a visible space between the upper and lower mandible of the bird seen when the bird’s bill is closed. A “blue morph” Snow Goose is the same size as the white morph with the same bill color, however the body is dark in coloration with variable amounts of white and darker colors along with a white head.

Range

Snow Geese breed in northern North America and migrate through much of North America. They winter in select areas of the United States and Central America, often in large flocks.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

Snow Geese are vegetarians that feed on grasses, shrubs, seeds, berries and more. Sometimes they will eat entire plants.

Where to Find this Bird

Snow Geese can be found in large flocks, mixed in with Ross’s Geese, Canada geese, and Cackling Geese. They are often seen in or near water, or in fields. Keep an eye out for mixed flocks flying overhead in a “V” formation.

Ross’s Goose (Rare)

Ross’s Goose (Bill Grossmeyer photo)
Identification

Along with Snow Geese, Ross’s Geese also have multiple color morphs. Adult white morph Ross’s Geese have an all white body, black wingtips, and a pinkish-orange bill with a small or absent “grin patch”. A blue morph Ross’s Goose will be the same size as the white morph with the same bill color, however the body will be dark in coloration with variable amounts of white and darker colors along with a white head. A true blue morph Ross’s Goose is very rare, and many are actually hybrid Snow and Ross’s Geese. Keep on the lookout for signs of hybridization such as a bird with a small, triangular bill but a large, dark grin patch. Overall, Ross’s Geese will be smaller than Snow Geese with a smaller, triangular bill that has a gray-blue base, and a stubbier neck.

Range

Ross’s Geese breed in northern North America in colonies and migrate through much of central and western North America. They winter in select areas of the United States and Central America, often in large flocks.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

Ross’s Geese are vegetarians that feed on grasses, shrubs, seeds, berries and more. Sometimes they will eat entire plants.

Where to Find this Bird

Ross’s Geese can be found in large flocks, mixed in with Snow Geese, Canada, and Cackling Geese. They are often seen in or near water, or in fields. Keep an eye out for mixed flocks flying overhead in a “V” formation.

Greater White-fronted Goose

Greater White-fronted Goose (Bill Grossmeyer photo)
Identification

Adult Greater White-fronted Geese (sometimes called Speckled Geese, or Speckle-belly Geese) are brown in color with a white rump, white stripe on their side, white forehead, black spots on their stomach and a bright pinkish-orange bill and legs. They can look similar to Greylag Geese, which are a domesticated species that can sometimes be seen in urban parks, but Greylag Geese will have a thicker bill, be larger and more stout, and have a striped neck.

Range

Greater White-fronted Geese breed in northern North America in colonies, and on the Alaskan tundra, and migrate through much of central and western North America. They winter in select areas of the western and southern United States and central America, often in large, mixed flocks.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

Greater White-fronted Geese feed mostly on plant material such as grasses, berries, sedges, emergent vegetation, and tubers.

Where to Find this Bird

Greater White-fronted Geese can be found in large flocks, mixed in with Ross’s, Snow, Canada, and Cackling Geese. They are often seen in or near water, or in fields. Keep an eye out for mixed flocks flying overhead in a “V” formation.

Barnacle Goose (Rare)

Barnacle Goose (Photo by Caleb Putnam)
Identification

The Barnacle Goose can be identified by its white face, black top of the head and neck, gray stomach, and gray, white, and black back.

Range

Barnacle Geese breed in the arctic North Atlantic islands. They are not native to the United States but sometimes they show up as vagrants, especially in the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada. Additionally, sometimes domesticated birds escape and are seen, therefore there should be some deliberation in considering whether the bird is wild or not.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

Barnacle Geese feed mostly on vegetation such as grasses and aquatic plants.

Find this Bird

Barnacle Geese are extremely rare in North America. Keep an eye out for this bird in flocks of other goose species, normally found near water or in open grassy areas and farm fields.

Pink-footed Goose (Rare)

Pink-footed Goose (Alan Shearman photo, CC by 2.0)
Identification

The Pink-footed Goose can be identified by its brown head and tan neck, gray-brown back, white side stripe, buff and white chest, white rump, pink feet, and stubby bill.

Range

Pink-footed Geese are not native to the United States but they sometimes stray into Eastern North America. When they do, they are an extreme rarity.

Diet and Foraging Behavior

Pink-footed Geese feed mostly on vegetation such as grasses and sedges.

Find this Bird

Pink-footed Geese are extremely rare in North America. Keep an eye out for this bird in flocks of other goose species, normally found near water or in open grassy areas and farm fields.

Which of these species have you seen? Leave a comment below and thanks for reading!